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Safety Smarts

history

in-school presentations

reports/evaluation

Program History

The Farm Safety Centre began “Safety Smarts” delivery in 1998.

Individual classes of rural elementary school students receive in-class farm safety instruction.

The 2019-2020 school year, while shortened by COVID 19 school closures, was the 22nd year of delivery.

Through the decades dedicated regional instructors have been face to face with 779,000+ rural children.

Get more information about grade specific safety topics under
In-School Presentations“.

Details about program reach and impact can be found under “Reports & Evaluations“.

Adaptations resulting from COVID 19 limitations can be found under “News & Events“.

Over the past 22 years regional instructors have:

Driven

1,821,711 KMs

Visited

6,831 Schools

Presented to

38,708 Classrooms

Reached

779,098 Children

Safety Smarts Historical Delivery

School Year
Face to Face Delivery
Children Reached Notes / Comments
1998-1999 2,230 First attempts at in-school delivery
1999-2000 4,228  
2000-2001 4,374  
2001-2002 4,564  
2002-2003 5,695  
2003-2004 5,835  
2004-2005 6,219  
2005-2006 16,778 Expanded reach – southern Alberta
2006-2007 25,419  
2007-2008 30,434  
2008-2009 47,611 Expanded reach – entire province
2009-2010 52,420  
2010-2011 55,480  
2011-2012 64,920  
2012-2013 52,529  
2013-2014 57,551  
2014-2015 51,144  
2015-2016 67,150  
2016-2017 65,575  
2017-2018 58,329  
2018-2019 59,984  
2019-2020 40,662 COVID school closures mid-March
2020-2021 18,533 COVID has impacted face to face delivery.
Virtual delivery began January 2021 and ran through June 2021

Pre-Covid Presentations for Rural Schools

Regional instructors use farm machinery models, pictures, short videos, and personal experience to introduce the children to farm safety. “One Seat One Rider” is emphasized.

“What Could Happen?” scenarios are discussed. 
Each child receives a take-home safety reminder to help them discuss farm safety with their families.

Regional instructors begin this presentation with a brief review of safety messages delivered in kindergarten.
To Stay Safe, Play Safe” is emphasized. 

Farm machinery models are used to visually highlight specific hazards. The children go on a visual “Hazard Hunt” which identifies potential hazards which could be found on a working farm.

During the visual “Walk About – Talk About” students are taught to evaluate whether specific situations or activities are safe or not.   They are encouraged to always ask an adult if they are unsure.
Each child receives a take-home safety reminder to help them discuss farm safety with their families.

Regional instructors begin this presentation with a brief review of safety messages delivered in kindergarten and grade 1.

A tragic personal experience is shared by the parents of a child lost to rural drowning.  This video introduces the children to the reality of drowning risks.

A variety of rural drowning hazards are presented and discussed using a game called “Boats Float Bingo”.

Still shots and short video clips, enable meaningful interaction and learning.

Each child receives a take-home safety reminder to help them discuss farm safety with their families.

Regional instructors begin this presentation with a brief review of safety messages delivered in kindergarten, grade 1, and grade 2.

The children are introduced to a rural risk they may never have thought much about – hearing safety. This risk is more intangible than those previously discussed and begins a transition into more situational based presentations where children are taught that personal choices lead to real consequences.

Using ear models, posters, pictures, video clips and animations children are shown how the ear works, how sound travels to the ear and how sound is measured. A sound level meter is used to demonstrate different decibel levels produced by machinery, animals, vehicles etc.

Students are taught that sounds that are too loud, for too long, or too often cause sound induced hearing loss. Children help graph the decibel levels/exposure time/frequency of farm sounds. Students get the opportunity to wear ear protectors and measure sounds with a sound level meter.
Each child receives a take-home safety reminder to help them discuss farm safety with their families.

Regional instructors begin this presentation with a brief review of safety messages delivered in previous kindergarten, grade 1, 2 and 3 presentations. Many farm safety concepts are reinforced.

The increased age, experience and learning capacity of these students allows more in-depth discussion. Depending on the class size, either 4 or 5 teams play “Splat” a farm safety jeopardy-based game which encourages discussion and allows reinforcement of a variety of farm safety messages.
Each child receives a take-home safety reminder to help them discuss farm safety with their families.

Regional instructors begin this presentation with a brief review of safety messages delivered in previous kindergarten, grade 1, 2, 3 and 4 presentations. Many farm safety concepts are reinforced.

Throughout this presentation emphasis is placed on decision making, personal boundaries and the importance of prevention. This presentation focuses on rider related falls and collisions.

Students are divided into 4 or 5 teams to play “Don’t Press Your Luck.” This fast-paced game encourages involvement and engages students intellectually as they make assessments and predictions.
Each child receives a take-home safety reminder to help them discuss farm safety with their families.

Regional instructors begin this presentation with a brief review of safety messages delivered in previous kindergarten, grade 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 presentations. Many farm safety concepts are reinforced.

Emphasis is placed on the impact personal decisions and behaviors have on not only their own safety but the safety and wellbeing of others. Time is spent discussing what influences their decision making. The importance of prevention and their personal ability to control outcomes is stressed.

Using a variety of engagement strategies and tools students learn about the causes and impact of head injuries.  Students are invited to experience the challenges of completing simple tasks while dealing with typical concussion symptoms.  Each child receives a take-home safety reminder to help them discuss farm safety with their families.

Pre-Covid Presentations for Hutterite Brethren Schools

Regional instructors begin this presentation with a brief review of safety messages delivered previously.  Many farm safety concepts are reinforced.  Our experienced instructors are mindful of the unique aspects of the Hutterite culture which require a thoughtful and respectful approach to farm safety messaging. 

A tragic personal experience is shared by the parents of a child lost to rural drowning.  This video introduces the children to the reality of drowning risks.

A variety of rural drowning hazards are presented and discussed using a game called “Boats Float Bingo”.              Still shots and short video clips, enable meaningful interaction and learning.
Each child receives a take-home safety reminder to help them discuss farm safety with their families.

Regional instructors begin this presentation with a brief review of safety messages delivered previously.  Many farm safety concepts are reinforced. Our experienced instructors are mindful of the unique aspects of the Hutterite culture which require a thoughtful and respectful approach to farm safety messaging. 

The children are introduced to a rural risk they may never have thought much about – hearing safety. This risk is more intangible than those previously discussed and begins a transition into more situational based presentations where children are taught that personal choices lead to real consequences.

Using ear models, posters, pictures, video clips and animations children are shown how the ear works, how sound travels to the ear and how sound is measured. A sound level meter is used to demonstrate different decibel levels produced by machinery, animals, vehicles etc.

Students are taught that sounds that are too loud, for too long, or too often cause sound induced hearing loss. Children help graph the decibel levels/exposure time/frequency of farm sounds. Students get the opportunity to wear ear protectors and measure sounds with a sound level meter.
Each child receives a take-home safety reminder to help them discuss farm safety with their families.

Regional instructors begin this presentation with a brief review of safety messages delivered previously.  Many farm safety concepts are reinforced. Our experienced instructors are mindful of the unique aspects of the Hutterite culture which require a thoughtful and respectful approach to farm safety messaging. 

The increased age, experience and learning capacity of these students allows more in-depth discussion.  The class is split into teams to play “Splat” a farm safety jeopardy-based game which encourages discussion and allows reinforcement of a variety of farm safety messages.
Each child receives a take-home safety reminder to help them discuss farm safety with their families.

Regional instructors begin this presentation with a brief review of safety messages delivered previously.  Many farm safety concepts are reinforced. Our experienced instructors are mindful of the unique aspects of the Hutterite culture which require a thoughtful and respectful approach to farm safety messaging. 

Throughout this presentation emphasis is placed on decision making, personal boundaries and the importance of prevention. This presentation focuses on rider related falls and collisions.

Students are divided into teams to play “Don’t Press Your Luck.” This fast-paced game encourages involvement and engages students intellectually as they make assessments and predictions.
Each child receives a take-home safety reminder to help them discuss farm safety with their families.

Regional instructors begin this presentation with a brief review of safety messages delivered previously.  Many farm safety concepts are reinforced. Our experienced instructors are mindful of the unique aspects of the Hutterite culture which require a thoughtful and respectful approach to farm safety messaging. 

Emphasis is placed on the impact personal decisions and behaviors have on not only their own safety but the safety and wellbeing of others. Time is spent discussing what influences their decision making. The importance of prevention and their personal ability to control outcomes is stressed.

Using a variety of engagement strategies and tools students learn about the causes and impact of head injuries.  Students are invited to experience the challenges of completing simple tasks while dealing with typical concussion symptoms.  Each child receives a take-home safety reminder to help them discuss farm safety with their families.

Safety Smarts Annual Reports

2019-2020

2018-2019

2017-2018

2016-2017

2015-2016

2014-2015

2013-2014

Safety Smarts Evaluation

Infographic

3 Page Highlights

Full Report

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